Nash Artists' Labo

Nash Artists' Labo

【Moment by Moment】Inoue applies the art of playing traditional Japanese instruments, such as the shamisen and biwa, to his guitar playing technique.

Nash Artists' Labo

Nash Artists' Labo

With style and artistry in mind, we maximize the creativity unique to each artist working at SoundArt Creation Nash Studio.

Nash Artists' Labo

Nash Artists' Labo

【Wildfire】“Can the erhu shout?” Her erhu smashed the long-held stereotypical image of it being a delicately built instrument, only capable of making "sobbing" sounds.

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Nash Artists' Labo

【Days】Just like the way you explore new landscapes or foreign countries

There's no need for guidance or navigation. Just like the way you explore new landscapes or foreign countries, you visit for the first time, all alone, carrying nothing. Days by Shinya Abe The world of poetry is full of ambiguity, contradiction, and metaphor, which reveal something exceptional. I do not want to tell a mundane story or make commonplace music. Exploring this album could be compared to the childhood experience of listening to something that you haven't heard before. What did you find in that first, innocent listening, without any prior knowledge attached to your experience? How did you feel? The music could be seen as only complete then and there. It changes in shape depending on the listener. I want you to experience this, so I removed all my claims. I stopped chasing the melody; this applies to both harmony and key. When you hear the sound, you might be in the act of creating something. With this in mind, I began to work on this album. The world is full of great music and sounds, but you happened to hear this. There's no need for guidance or navigation. Just like the way you explore new landscapes or foreign countries, you visit for the first time, all alone, carrying nothing. Shinya Abe (Musician / Composer) --- Make music like drawing, literally. How the mind relates to the world is what will appear, as light and colors, on an empty canvas. Then why not "draw" your music in the same way? In this way, you no longer have a particular musical form or factor, but you scatter sounds, which carry the burden of freedom, on the time axis to produce a piece of art. This vexing, demanding work depends solely on the strength of the artist's creative vision. In this bustling, modern world of information overload, the young Abe seems to try getting through with his unique and silent passion. He chose this tiresome way of sound creation, working under intense "constraint," which, paradoxically, is to make music "freely." You can't envisage the work, except when you face the finished "sound itself." This "Days" album; is, to be honest, a difficult one. Is it what Abe had on his mind, what he wanted to convey? He nodded silently, again and again, to my repeated questioning. It is <everyday> that he lives. Yoshinari Nashiki (Producer)

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Nash Artists' Labo

【In Between】A string quartet album of wabi-sabi quietude and pathos.

Wabi-sabi (the aesthetic sensibility conveyed through Japanese art, emphasizing transience, quiet simplicity, imperfection, and subdued refinement), which underlies Japanese traditions, such as the gardens, haiku, and tea ceremony, is inherited in this album “in-between,” whose minimalistic musicality denies gaudiness or affectation while relying on exquisitely good timing, called “間 - ma” in Japanese. In Between by  Kashiwamori Osamu Quartet The music retains the cool beauty and tranquility found in Japanese black lacquer. It's reminiscent of the way a black coat changes its tone as the light hits the surface. In spite of its withered, zen-like quietude, the music shakes the sensibility and imagination of the listener because simplicity and minimalism create pure, compelling beauty. At the same time, these pure-black string works retain a strong sense of Japanese emotion called “あわれ - aware” - of the sadness or pathos of things. This sense of sadness sometimes sinks way deeper down until it approaches the core of a Bashyo-style haiku, the idea of immutability that transcends time, beckoning the listener into a mysterious religious realm. Daisuke Muraoka (Production Staff / Overseas Sales)   The composer/producer Nashiki and the members of the Kashiwamori Osamu Quartet.   The Kashiwamori Osamu Quartet is a classical quartet performing around the Kansai area, composed of the following members:Osamu Kashiwamori, a Japanese cellist who plays for the Kansai 21st Century Symphony Orchestra and the Kansai Chamber Music Association.Keiichi Nishimura, a Japanese violinist and the musical director of the Osaka Vivaldi ensemble and the Kobe Mozart ensemble.Tadaaki Kamikawa, a Japanese violinist and a member of the Kansai 21st Century Symphony Orchestra.Arata Yamagiwa, a Japanese violist who plays regularly with the Nara Philharmonic Orchestra.

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Nash Artists' Labo

【Overflow】Dharma Budaya is a Japanese Gamelan group set up by the music study room members at Osaka University in 1979 as a collaborative operation with the Ueno Foundation for Art and Culture of Asia.

This album “Overflow” is the first original collection by “Dharma Budaya,” and also the first Java Gamelan recording in Japan. Dharma Budaya is a Japanese Gamelan group set up by the members of the music study room at Osaka University in 1979 as a collaborative operation with the Ueno Foundation for Art and Culture of Asia. They have studied classical Indonesian music from Central Java consistently while contributing to contemporary Gamelan scenes by performing new compositions. In 1996, they performed in four Indonesian cities with success. In recent years, the members of Dharma Budaya have been engaged in honing their craft in Indonesian classical music performance, striving to embody the tradition. Simultaneously, they are writing original compositions to bring a new productive dimension to the legendary musical tradition. Dharma Budaya means “one who takes responsibility for culture.” Overflow by Dharma Budaya This album was inspired by a performance of “Gekidantaihen,” a unique group in the sense that all the members are physically disabled; the composer,stage director, and Kim Manri (金満里), the leading performer himself. Their performance “Kochu-Ichimanen-Sai (壺中一萬年祭)” was based on an ancient Chinese story in which a man named Fei Changfang (費長房) experiences an alternative reality when he gets trapped inside a crock.Kim Manri once said, “If you can move a finger, you can express yourself and the universe.” To paraphrase, “There is a universe that can be expressed only by a person who can move nothing but a finger.” Limitation produces art - there's no space for creativity to flourish without limitation.Instruments used in Gamelan look like crocks made of bronze and the sound is produced by hitting various containers. Literally, sound pours out of the pots and jars. The album title came from the fact that various containers - jugs, vases, bottles, pans, etc. - have been regarded as vessels where different things are mixed and produced in both the East and the West. ”Java’s Gamelan sounds ethnic and international at the same time. It allows the listener to feel the future and the past, and head deep into an inner self and a vastly expanding world. Gamelan encompasses this profound ambivalence. We tried to create 'our own Gamelan music,' which sounds neither traditional nor contemporary.” Dharma Budaya

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Nash Artists' Labo

【Sympathy with Harmony】Hear the sense of unity with nature and life.

Free from human creation, and merely listening to the sound of nature. Nashiki, an environmental/ambient composer pursues the sound of silence and non-self. The sense of unity with nature and life and hitherto unknown spiritual sounds are captured. They unfurl a world of sparkling images while emitting the sound of life itself. Sympathy with Harmony (with notes by Yoshinari Nashiki)   【Sympathy with Harmony:Forest】 One who loves the forest will hear the forestIn the form of the wind swaying the trees,A glimmering sunbeam streaming through,And eventually glistening greenery.Those who love the forest will hear the forest.   【Sympathy with Harmony:Stars】 If thousands of light particles filling the skyPenetrate the land with their motionless presence.A transient life shall only linger in silence.   【Sympathy with Harmony:Sea】 The ocean undulates from afar.Sent straight from there is an esoteric voice.Every single life form bows its headListening with deep reverence.   【Sympathy with Harmony:Winds】 The wind courses through the distant sky.The wind courses through the green fields.The wind courses through the old trees.The wind courses through this sadness.   【Sympathy with Harmony:River】 Hear the light dancing on the river.Hear the brilliance of water splashingRapidly intersecting.Hear the quiet mind resting there.   【Sympathy with Harmony:Sylvan Sunlights】 Like one who was born in a sunbeam streaming through the foliageI become nostalgic for the rays of light.Like one who is dying in the sunbeam streaming through the foliageI cherish the rays of light.   【Sympathy with Harmony:Lake】 The lake reclines peacefully.On the surface of the water reflecting the mist lies a faintly undulating illusion.Its reverberation never disappears.   【Sympathy with Harmony:Plateau】 The crystal clear blue light of the entire skyReflects and scatters over the stream’s innocent murmurs.It stirs the green wind and penetrates the transparent mountain plateau.   【Sympathy with Harmony:Twilight】 The color that only the sunset displays.The scent that only the sunset emits.The sound that only the sunset transmits.This expanse is known as the sunset.This love is named sunset.   【Sympathy with Harmony:Countryside】 In the calm light of the sunshine.Caressed by the wind blowing over a gentle hill.Lying under the trees.I want to be embraced by the light and the pastoral greenness.   All Music by Yoshinari Nashiki

Nash Artists' Labo

【Oblivion】Convey a complete story by playing only one oboe without relying on visuals or words.

Self Production Note by Hiroyuki Jyutori We use music to bring various dimensions of reality to plays, movies, images, and environments. I’m aware that my humble oboe performance plays a role in such a process. Yet, what if I could playact, putting on a show by the sole enterprise of my musical execution? If one oboe performance could amount to a semblance of cinema without relying on visual content or words, what would it be like? All kinds of visions come to mind when my imagination runs on such a thread. This particular fancy came true, affecting my future as an oboe player. When Nash Studio commissioned me to participate in one of their "Artists' Labo" projects, I could barely contain my excitement. Such was my eagerness to play as soon as possible. I remember setting off for the studio at a brisk pace but without a concrete vision in mind. Consequently, when they asked me what I'd like to do or what I could bring to the project, I could only say "Just too many things..." However, as I played in front of the microphone, my preoccupation for “musical cinema” gave birth to new methods and techniques, which eventually served to highlight my warped visions, clearly and contrastively. The album invites you to take a mysterious journey of imagination into an unknown world, which may resemble this earth, or the other side, through the oboe’s musical dramatics. The theme of the dying clinging to life runs throughout, sensing the presence of an unfathomable force that controls such matters. Indeed, my instrument’s relentless wailing and wild distortion go far out, which is truly inconceivable in terms of regular oboe music and its characteristic tone and beauty. In retrospect, what I demonstrated here is not an expression of bitterness, resentment, or regret. Instead, I realize now that the oboe in this album portrays human beings in the future whose image is shaped by our innate attachment to life and imagination. With all my prayers for a beautiful future. Hiroyuki Jyutori (Oboist / Musician)   This avant-garde ambient album arose from an experiment in Music Cinema, which aimed to convey a complete story by playing only one oboe without relying on visuals or words. On this challenging concept album, the performer directly sounds out his vision and aura to spin story after story as an improvised storyteller of sounds.

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Nash Artists' Labo

【God of Fire and People of Stars】Shinto oracle priestesses," who emerged in ancient Japan, at a time when language had not yet been developed.

For this album, Kamimura chose the theme of "Miko (巫女) - Shinto oracle priestesses," who emerged in ancient Japan, at a time when language had not yet been developed. God of Fire and People of Stars by Shigezo Kamimura The recording was made at a studio nestled in a natural environment located at the foot of Daisen, a volcanic mountain in Tottori Prefecture. This setting allowed the warm wooden sound of marimba, gamelan-like glockenspiel, and folksy human whistle to resound directly through the middle of the forest. The Indonesian gamelan-like round and soft sounds have subtle warmth, and they deeply and infallibly penetrate the listener's skin. Upon the first hearing, this music is so compact and minimally executed that it reminds the listener of chamber music. Simultaneously, its mantra-induced floating feeling gains access to the external world until it reaches universal expansion. Meditative, healing sounds melt together, allowing the forest and nature itself to fully envelope the listener. "When I performed live at the Hikami Shrine in Iwate Prefecture, the sun happened to shine so strongly, and the crowd appeared to transform into a colossal dragon. The vibration I felt from this experience inspired me to start making this album," said Kamimura. This album "ヒノカミホシノカミ - God of Fire and People of Stars" demonstrates a version of the roots crucial to Japanese culture, such as "Sun God Worship" and a mythological cosmic view of "Fire = God/Stars = People." When Miko's innocent and crystal-clear chorus resounds in the almost universal minimal soundscape, the music attains a purely Japanesque beauty. Daisuke Muraoka (Production Staff / Overseas Sales)

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Nash Artists' Labo

【Black Strings】The guitar to become a "wagakki (Japanese instrument)." But how?

The guitar, which is also known as a "small orchestra," takes on a "deep black" tone in response to the Japanese soil and spirituality, which is incredibly rich in humidity and irrationality. Black Stringsby 3rd-craft Making guitar into "wagakki (traditional Japanese instruments)" As usual, an idea came up during a casual discussion and soon led to a heated production meeting. Our guitarists seemed to find difficulty grasping the concept (it may be my imagination, but their faces soured as if the whole thing was an unthinkable fancy). The production progressed very slowly. "Write Japanese-style compositions and play them on guitar?" No. "Form a guitar and Japanese traditional instrument ensemble?" Wrong. "Tweak the guitar somehow to sound exotically Japanese?" It won't work. "Try a Japanese melodic open tuning?" Hmmm. If you treat and play the guitar like a koto, a biwa, or a shamisen, it could turn out to be a fun thing to do. However, doubt kept entering our minds, despite it being an interesting idea—should we really take this on as one of our projects? We came to the following conclusion: Let us leave it to other people to play the guitar in ​​the realm of traditional Japanese music, which has been established in various ways. Suppose we, as contemporary Japanese musicians, allow the guitar to emit a sound that is rarely heard by the ears of Westerners or even Japanese listeners? In this case, the guitar would become a "Japanese" instrument. Again, as usual, we came to theorizing things (or slightly forcing logic), and the process of trial and error began.   So, here's how the "black string" album turned out: We claim that this album's sound production would have been rendered impossible without Japan's unique musical/non-musical mentality, sense of space/time, and our nature worship/religion. The guitar, which is also known as a "small orchestra," takes on a "deep black" tone in response to the Japanese soil and spirituality, which is incredibly rich in humidity and irrationality. The guitarist, Ito, performed excellently. I was amazed at his spontaneity, which I even find exceptional, and his way of alternating between "playing" and "hearing" through his dignified and determined musicianship. Yoshinari Nashiki (Producer of "Black Strings" / Music Production Advisor)   Nashiki and Scramble Ito at the studio

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In August 2018, we celebrated Nash Music Library's 35th year in business.

⇈Staff working at the studio in the '80s⇈  In August 2018, thanks to our esteemed users' patronage, Nash Music Library celebrated its 35th anniversary. Since its founding in 1983, Nash Music Library has consistently focused on producing original tracks in-house, administering all rights related to our works, and licensing them on the most simple "royalty-free" basis to provide people with easy-to-use sound resources for their video production and other creative projects. Various individuals and entities are involved in producing musical content and distributing it to society. Multiple rights issues arise accordingly—involving composers, lyricists, arrangers, performers, record companies, publishers, distributors, etc. Depending on the terms of use of the tune (the terms can vary depending on the piece, the location of production and use, and so on) you may need to clear various licenses and be forced to pay higher usage fees than you’d initially expect.   Yoshinari Nashiki, the founder of Nash Music Library, often heard the troubled voices of professional broadcasters, video producers, and sound designers who use background music for their projects while navigating complicated music rights clearance issues. Thus, Nashiki came up with the idea of a "complete royalty-free" license, optimized for creatives who need background music for business use. He began producing the music content himself, to accumulate tunes with the aim of creating a music library from which professionals could select music for their creative projects, whatever the medium of expression; TV, radio, commercial, cinema, advertising, and now YouTube and other SNS platforms. Since then, we at Nash Studio, have added music content (currently approaching 30,000 tracks in total) while building close relationships with musicians, composers, and other collaborators with whom we work.   Yoshinari Nashiki, founder of Nash Music Library working at the studio around the startup phase. Nowadays, "Computer Music” has become commonplace, and it is now possible for one person to start and finish a piece of music, solely. Large-scale consumer online music streaming services have become commonplace, which has made it easy for anyone to release their work. A multitude of audio content gets uploaded daily worldwide, and the AI that produces decent compositions recently attracted attention. We are entering an era that may see an oversupply of music content, regardless of whether it consists of commercial tunes that people enjoy or background music resources for media production. In our rapidly changing world, with increasingly complicated copyright issues, what is required of a contemporary music library? We strive to adhere to complete in-house management of music rights for transparent licensing and professional, creative music production. We will continue to grow and develop in line with current and future circumstances. -SoundArtCreation Nash Studio Staff

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