Nash Artists' Labo

Nash Artists' Labo

【Moment by Moment】Inoue applies the art of playing traditional Japanese instruments, such as the shamisen and biwa, to his guitar playing technique.

Nash Artists' Labo

Nash Artists' Labo

With style and artistry in mind, we maximize the creativity unique to each artist working at SoundArt Creation Nash Studio.

Nash Artists' Labo

Nash Artists' Labo

【Wildfire】“Can the erhu shout?” Her erhu smashed the long-held stereotypical image of it being a delicately built instrument, only capable of making "sobbing" sounds.

Reccomend

Nash Artists' Labo

【Overflow】Dharma Budaya is a Japanese Gamelan group set up by the music study room members at Osaka University in 1979 as a collaborative operation with the Ueno Foundation for Art and Culture of Asia.

This album “Overflow” is the first original collection by “Dharma Budaya,” and also the first Java Gamelan recording in Japan. Dharma Budaya is a Japanese Gamelan group set up by the members of the music study room at Osaka University in 1979 as a collaborative operation with the Ueno Foundation for Art and Culture of Asia. They have studied classical Indonesian music from Central Java consistently while contributing to contemporary Gamelan scenes by performing new compositions. In 1996, they performed in four Indonesian cities with success. In recent years, the members of Dharma Budaya have been engaged in honing their craft in Indonesian classical music performance, striving to embody the tradition. Simultaneously, they are writing original compositions to bring a new productive dimension to the legendary musical tradition. Dharma Budaya means “one who takes responsibility for culture.” Overflow by Dharma Budaya This album was inspired by a performance of “Gekidantaihen,” a unique group in the sense that all the members are physically disabled; the composer,stage director, and Kim Manri (金満里), the leading performer himself. Their performance “Kochu-Ichimanen-Sai (壺中一萬年祭)” was based on an ancient Chinese story in which a man named Fei Changfang (費長房) experiences an alternative reality when he gets trapped inside a crock.Kim Manri once said, “If you can move a finger, you can express yourself and the universe.” To paraphrase, “There is a universe that can be expressed only by a person who can move nothing but a finger.” Limitation produces art - there's no space for creativity to flourish without limitation.Instruments used in Gamelan look like crocks made of bronze and the sound is produced by hitting various containers. Literally, sound pours out of the pots and jars. The album title came from the fact that various containers - jugs, vases, bottles, pans, etc. - have been regarded as vessels where different things are mixed and produced in both the East and the West. ”Java’s Gamelan sounds ethnic and international at the same time. It allows the listener to feel the future and the past, and head deep into an inner self and a vastly expanding world. Gamelan encompasses this profound ambivalence. We tried to create 'our own Gamelan music,' which sounds neither traditional nor contemporary.” Dharma Budaya

Reccomend

Nash Artists' Labo

【Sympathy with Harmony】Hear the sense of unity with nature and life.

Free from human creation, and merely listening to the sound of nature. Nashiki, an environmental/ambient composer pursues the sound of silence and non-self. The sense of unity with nature and life and hitherto unknown spiritual sounds are captured. They unfurl a world of sparkling images while emitting the sound of life itself. Sympathy with Harmony (with notes by Yoshinari Nashiki)   【Sympathy with Harmony:Forest】 One who loves the forest will hear the forestIn the form of the wind swaying the trees,A glimmering sunbeam streaming through,And eventually glistening greenery.Those who love the forest will hear the forest.   【Sympathy with Harmony:Stars】 If thousands of light particles filling the skyPenetrate the land with their motionless presence.A transient life shall only linger in silence.   【Sympathy with Harmony:Sea】 The ocean undulates from afar.Sent straight from there is an esoteric voice.Every single life form bows its headListening with deep reverence.   【Sympathy with Harmony:Winds】 The wind courses through the distant sky.The wind courses through the green fields.The wind courses through the old trees.The wind courses through this sadness.   【Sympathy with Harmony:River】 Hear the light dancing on the river.Hear the brilliance of water splashingRapidly intersecting.Hear the quiet mind resting there.   【Sympathy with Harmony:Sylvan Sunlights】 Like one who was born in a sunbeam streaming through the foliageI become nostalgic for the rays of light.Like one who is dying in the sunbeam streaming through the foliageI cherish the rays of light.   【Sympathy with Harmony:Lake】 The lake reclines peacefully.On the surface of the water reflecting the mist lies a faintly undulating illusion.Its reverberation never disappears.   【Sympathy with Harmony:Plateau】 The crystal clear blue light of the entire skyReflects and scatters over the stream’s innocent murmurs.It stirs the green wind and penetrates the transparent mountain plateau.   【Sympathy with Harmony:Twilight】 The color that only the sunset displays.The scent that only the sunset emits.The sound that only the sunset transmits.This expanse is known as the sunset.This love is named sunset.   【Sympathy with Harmony:Countryside】 In the calm light of the sunshine.Caressed by the wind blowing over a gentle hill.Lying under the trees.I want to be embraced by the light and the pastoral greenness.   All Music by Yoshinari Nashiki

Reccomend

Nash Artists' Labo

【God of Fire and People of Stars】Shinto oracle priestesses," who emerged in ancient Japan, at a time when language had not yet been developed.

For this album, Kamimura chose the theme of "Miko (巫女) - Shinto oracle priestesses," who emerged in ancient Japan, at a time when language had not yet been developed. God of Fire and People of Stars by Shigezo Kamimura The recording was made at a studio nestled in a natural environment located at the foot of Daisen, a volcanic mountain in Tottori Prefecture. This setting allowed the warm wooden sound of marimba, gamelan-like glockenspiel, and folksy human whistle to resound directly through the middle of the forest. The Indonesian gamelan-like round and soft sounds have subtle warmth, and they deeply and infallibly penetrate the listener's skin. Upon the first hearing, this music is so compact and minimally executed that it reminds the listener of chamber music. Simultaneously, its mantra-induced floating feeling gains access to the external world until it reaches universal expansion. Meditative, healing sounds melt together, allowing the forest and nature itself to fully envelope the listener. "When I performed live at the Hikami Shrine in Iwate Prefecture, the sun happened to shine so strongly, and the crowd appeared to transform into a colossal dragon. The vibration I felt from this experience inspired me to start making this album," said Kamimura. This album "ヒノカミホシノカミ - God of Fire and People of Stars" demonstrates a version of the roots crucial to Japanese culture, such as "Sun God Worship" and a mythological cosmic view of "Fire = God/Stars = People." When Miko's innocent and crystal-clear chorus resounds in the almost universal minimal soundscape, the music attains a purely Japanesque beauty. Daisuke Muraoka (Production Staff / Overseas Sales)

Reccomend

Nash Artists' Labo

【Black Strings】The guitar to become a "wagakki (Japanese instrument)." But how?

The guitar, which is also known as a "small orchestra," takes on a "deep black" tone in response to the Japanese soil and spirituality, which is incredibly rich in humidity and irrationality. Black Stringsby 3rd-craft Making guitar into "wagakki (traditional Japanese instruments)" As usual, an idea came up during a casual discussion and soon led to a heated production meeting. Our guitarists seemed to find difficulty grasping the concept (it may be my imagination, but their faces soured as if the whole thing was an unthinkable fancy). The production progressed very slowly. "Write Japanese-style compositions and play them on guitar?" No. "Form a guitar and Japanese traditional instrument ensemble?" Wrong. "Tweak the guitar somehow to sound exotically Japanese?" It won't work. "Try a Japanese melodic open tuning?" Hmmm. If you treat and play the guitar like a koto, a biwa, or a shamisen, it could turn out to be a fun thing to do. However, doubt kept entering our minds, despite it being an interesting idea—should we really take this on as one of our projects? We came to the following conclusion: Let us leave it to other people to play the guitar in ​​the realm of traditional Japanese music, which has been established in various ways. Suppose we, as contemporary Japanese musicians, allow the guitar to emit a sound that is rarely heard by the ears of Westerners or even Japanese listeners? In this case, the guitar would become a "Japanese" instrument. Again, as usual, we came to theorizing things (or slightly forcing logic), and the process of trial and error began.   So, here's how the "black string" album turned out: We claim that this album's sound production would have been rendered impossible without Japan's unique musical/non-musical mentality, sense of space/time, and our nature worship/religion. The guitar, which is also known as a "small orchestra," takes on a "deep black" tone in response to the Japanese soil and spirituality, which is incredibly rich in humidity and irrationality. The guitarist, Ito, performed excellently. I was amazed at his spontaneity, which I even find exceptional, and his way of alternating between "playing" and "hearing" through his dignified and determined musicianship. Yoshinari Nashiki (Producer of "Black Strings" / Music Production Advisor)   Nashiki and Scramble Ito at the studio

Feature

Core Message

In August 2018, we celebrated Nash Music Library's 35th year in business.

⇈Staff working at the studio in the '80s⇈  In August 2018, thanks to our esteemed users' patronage, Nash Music Library celebrated its 35th anniversary. Since its founding in 1983, Nash Music Library has consistently focused on producing original tracks in-house, administering all rights related to our works, and licensing them on the most simple "royalty-free" basis to provide people with easy-to-use sound resources for their video production and other creative projects. Various individuals and entities are involved in producing musical content and distributing it to society. Multiple rights issues arise accordingly—involving composers, lyricists, arrangers, performers, record companies, publishers, distributors, etc. Depending on the terms of use of the tune (the terms can vary depending on the piece, the location of production and use, and so on) you may need to clear various licenses and be forced to pay higher usage fees than you’d initially expect.   Yoshinari Nashiki, the founder of Nash Music Library, often heard the troubled voices of professional broadcasters, video producers, and sound designers who use background music for their projects while navigating complicated music rights clearance issues. Thus, Nashiki came up with the idea of a "complete royalty-free" license, optimized for creatives who need background music for business use. He began producing the music content himself, to accumulate tunes with the aim of creating a music library from which professionals could select music for their creative projects, whatever the medium of expression; TV, radio, commercial, cinema, advertising, and now YouTube and other SNS platforms. Since then, we at Nash Studio, have added music content (currently approaching 30,000 tracks in total) while building close relationships with musicians, composers, and other collaborators with whom we work.   Yoshinari Nashiki, founder of Nash Music Library working at the studio around the startup phase. Nowadays, "Computer Music” has become commonplace, and it is now possible for one person to start and finish a piece of music, solely. Large-scale consumer online music streaming services have become commonplace, which has made it easy for anyone to release their work. A multitude of audio content gets uploaded daily worldwide, and the AI that produces decent compositions recently attracted attention. We are entering an era that may see an oversupply of music content, regardless of whether it consists of commercial tunes that people enjoy or background music resources for media production. In our rapidly changing world, with increasingly complicated copyright issues, what is required of a contemporary music library? We strive to adhere to complete in-house management of music rights for transparent licensing and professional, creative music production. We will continue to grow and develop in line with current and future circumstances. -SoundArtCreation Nash Studio Staff

Reccomend

Nash Artists' Labo

Triple Cello Album. The individual charms and skill of the three performers shine through in every song.

This album features three Japanese cellists (shown from left to right in the photo): Osamu Kashiwamori, Hiromi Takenaka, and Katsumasa Fujiwara. A variety of unique compositions stimulated the cellists, straddling classical music, traditional Japanese music, and rock riffs, and they thoroughly absorbed each piece with their special sensibility that combines a Japanese spirit with Western training. Triad by Katafu Cello Trio As the leader, Kashiwamori stabilizes the ensemble with his reliable and well-practiced calmness. As the only female member, Takenaka adds a delicate touch of elegance and sophistication to the whole sound. Immensely dynamic and youthful, Fujiwara handles even the most challenging fingering. They each play very differently. In the traditional musical context, especially in the classical genre, the ensemble often requires all cellists to play the same phrases or melodies simultaneously. However, the principal concept for this album, "Triad" was to divide roles into three parts, such as melody, backing, and bass, among three players. As the producer and composer for the album, I consciously wrote pieces that would emphasize the different characteristics of the three. The album also includes Kashiwamori's original compositions.   Imaginative Commitment to the Number "3" ・ In this emotional tune called "Hard Triad," the three cellists play their respective roles for the dramatic love triangle theme as if they were acting the main parts in a movie. ・The heroic melody of the "Three-Party Dance" depicts a dynamic triangular fight scene – this may turn out to be the perfect soundtrack for chanbara (sword fighting) scenes in Japanese period dramas or action movies. ・The rock tune "Quick Sand" expresses the Three Poisons of Buddhism (three afflictions or character flaws innate in human beings and the root cause of suffering, pain, and rebirth) fated for the protagonist of a famous Ryunosuke Akutagawa novel, "The Spider's Thread." ・ The "Sword of Sparks" vividly reproduces the process of swordsmithing, in which each of the three players takes on the roles of "striking (the melody)," "sharpening (the backing)," and "holding (the bass)," respectively.   Furthermore, the album includes experimental songs, such as "East-Southeast Wind," in which the smallest units of phrases mutate as they would in a contemporary piece of minimal music. The famous Japanese festival-themed track, "Tenjin" imitates the unique technique employed in taiko (Japanese drums) and surigane (metal Japanese percussion) performance. All of the album pieces are original works, including the "impossible" classical-style tune, "Triple Peaks," in which it was challenging to achieve certain high notes, a special and unique reverberation that is found only in the sound of the cello. The individual charms and skill of the three performers shine through in every song.   Manabu Kondo (Produer of "Triad"/ Production Director)

Nash Music Channel

Is it cheap because the app contains music made by amateur musicians? Or does it play songs that failed to be commercial hits?

We often receive the following inquiries regarding the Nash Music Channel, our background music player app, which offers the lowest subscription price in Japan (at least currently.) "Is it cheap because the app contains music made by amateur musicians? Or does it play songs that failed to be commercial hits?" How come this low fee? (350 Japanese yen, the equivalent of $3.00 per month.) There seem to be quite a few people who are wondering about that. In setting the price, some of our staff voiced (quite a few internal opinions, actually) that a monthly fee of about 1,000 yen would be appropriate. As a result of researching the whole domestic background music market and looking into the services of other companies, the amount seemed decent enough; but I could not shake off a doubt. Background music clients are mostly stores, shops, and restaurants. The total number of users would be limited. You cannot expect a sudden expansion of the user base if you only provide another conventional background music service. Won't we end up becoming just one more vendor to scramble for clients? We may accelerate price competition and cause unwanted suffering among background music companies. If the background music industry, the work available for musicians will decrease, or worse, they may be forced out of the profession. The problem falls on us, we musicians who make music at the end of the day. We never want to strangle ourselves and others involved in music production. We should not enter the market, just like that. We have to bring new things that have a positive effect on the situation surrounding us. If we could revitalize the background music industry, it might lead to a better world for us musicians, at least. That way more of us might have the chance to become actively involved in the business. We considered, weighing the pros and cons, going through trial and error in our thoughts. Here's our answer to "How come this low fee? "Not to win the lowest price competition, of course. We lower the fee as much as possible to develop a new user base that has been unfamiliar with background music services. There should be more people in this society who have the potential to use background music. Not only retail shops but also event organizers; youngsters who live stream on SNS; expressive people who perform in shows or plays; families who want to enjoy the atmosphere of eating out even at home; friends who seek extra fun when playing games. We want everyone to know the pleasure of adding some background music to their life. Besides, some people are hesitant to play background music in public because they are concerned about music copyright and legal issues. Some stores may be restricted by their tight budget. It's generally known that you need to pay a license fee to the copyright holder before playing audio in public places via a commercial CD or music streaming service. It could be too expensive, a lot of hassle. Our wish is that a wide range of people in society and really everyone starts using background music without such worries. We want to liberate the people from conventional rules in terms of playing music in public. For that ideal, 1,000 yen per month would be too expensive. Fortunately, our main business has been the "Nash Music Library," which provides background music to broadcasters and video content creators. The service celebrated its 35th anniversary in 2018, always patronized by people who need background music for their creative projects. Even if we lower the price of the Nash Music Channel, it won't necessarily bring us down. To provide background music to a broader range of users, Isn't this our new mission? Thus, we went for 350 yen per month and developed a mobile app that's suitably simple and easy to use.  We'll make a society that can choose and use background music depending on mood, place, purpose, or any particular interest. We'll make it possible for people to carry the audio around to play it anytime, anywhere. That was our vision upon the launch of the Nash Music Channel.   Manabu Kondo (Nash Music Channel Development Producer / Production Director)   The app is available on the Nash Music Channel website

NASH MUSIC LIBRARY

We work like potters who create everyday plates and utensils.

The artists at our studio always work in earnest to create new pieces of music. However, compared with general music production studios, our way of making music may be compared to the artistry of a pottery studio where they make tableware and utensils; products that are specifically designed for daily use. Tableware is something that everyone uses. We need lots of it, and in different colors, shapes, and sizes: Choices for daily use that we won't tire of too soon. There should be pieces of simple taste and others to convey a luxurious atmosphere; Japanese patterns and Western-style varieties; perhaps with stylishly unusual angles, and also surprisingly experimental designs that you would not expect to be used as plates or utensils. There are all kinds of cuisines in the world. Accordingly, a wide variety of tableware is needed to serve them attractively and practically. Our background music production method has a lot in common with the way tableware is created. We are engaged in crafting music that provides an accompaniment to and complements your creative expression - your cooking. We consider this a suitable analogy.     To meet diverse needs, and prepare a wide variety of suitable "background" sounds, we carefully set a direction for each new project (the production of an album) before beginning our work. We discuss ideas and share the framework for making something appropriate for a certain occasion with all the artists involved in the project, and then each individual starts working on their contribution. By doing so, we ensure that our library achieves a broader range of selection. We are ever-conscious of stretching our reach a little further in terms of our catalog range. Thus, the work of our artists never ends. Like potters, if we finish one piece, we begin the next, and continue this process over and over again. Our modus operandi has nothing to do with being in the spotlight or on a stage. We focus on our daily creative efforts, striving to do our very best. We enjoy envisioning something that people may like and feel good about using. We work for the pursuit of our artistry, driven by an analytical appetite, approaching the far reaches of musical possibilities. We experiment with unique patterns, new methods, different materials, and help each other whenever needed. Most of the sounds produced via the daily efforts of our studio artists have been taking roles similar to the tableware choices that complement your cooking - your creative expression. We invite you to sample a serving or two if you are so inclined and hungry for a little musical accompaniment. In our own way, we at the SoundArtCreation Nash Studio continue to pursue the creation of music that you can use as everyday essentials. Daisuke Muraoka (Production Staff / Overseas Sales & PR)

Loading...